Advice and Lessons from Women Leaders Who Drive Change

Figure 1: A leader sets direction, aligns resources, and motivates action.

On April 29, 2014 IntelliVen sponsored the San Francisco Bay Area Organization Development Network (BAodn) panel discussion on the topic of Women Who Drive Change.

BAodn President Steve McGee facilitated the discussion in front of an audience of over 40 people at Big Heart Pet Brands Headquarters, One Maritime Plaza in San Francisco.

 

Panelists:

  • Dena McFarland; was part of a significant change at Xerox where they restructured the company yet didn’t lay off anyone.  She was also a consultant for hospitals to change their mindset from physician-centered to patient-centered.
  • Jeanamaria M. Alayaay; co-facilitated Lean Startup Product Development trainings for the White House’s Presidential innovation fellows and Presidential leadership programs, Enterprise Ireland (the Irish government’s tech accelerator), Evernote, and Microsoft Imagine Cup.  She works at Luxr.

A rough summary of key points panelists offered in response to opening questions follows:

Advice from women who drive change:

  • View everything you experience as “one more piece of an ever-evolving whole”. Continue reading

How services firms should think about what they do to help leaders turn ideas into benefits.

Framework for Service Providers along the Idea-to-Benefit Cycle

There are many ways to provide value to leaders who seek to turn ideas into benefits!  Service providers need to get and stay clear about how they help leaders in order to perform and grow to their full potential.

Click the figure to view a presentation on how to think about helping leaders turn ideas into benefits.

How anyone can use a leadership system to increase the odds of organization success sooner.

The Manage to Lead: Seven Truths to Help You Change the World workbook presents leaders with content, work problems, cases, and templates. The collective work product forms the essential elements of a multi-year strategic plan that communicates how the organization sees itself, where it is headed, how it will get there, and what it will do to ensure the plan is achieved.

Those who read, study, and practice Manage to Lead: Seven Truths to Help You Change the World know and appreciate that seven leadership truths and actions that make sense in light of them, when applied correctly, lead an organization to perform and grow according to its plan.

The truths and their actions guide leaders to describe: where their organization is now, where they want it to be next, how it will get there, and increase the odds of getting it there sooner.

The seven truths and the actions they drive are each summarized below. Click on the icon at left to get a close look at each truth and a summary of the actions it drives. Page back and click on the action headers at right for a look at the introduction to that segment of the workbook.

Get Clear

Get Clear – Describe the organization in terms of whose problem it solves, how (as in how does it: do, sell, and grow what it does), how well (compared to: others, its past, and relative to its plan and projections). Lay out how its finances work with an income statement, cash flow, and balance sheet for the past two years, current four quarters, and two years hence. Continue reading

How leaders can upgrade status report submissions with one-on-one meetings to increase the odds of better results sooner.

Stick Figures of Leaders in ActionLeaders whose direct reports submit regular (e.g., monthly) status reports on progress, problems, and plans should consider re-working their approach to include more frequent (e.g., bi-weekly), one-on-one, real-time (in person or via the Web) meetings to discuss submitted progress reports and to collaborate and align on how things are going, priorities, and next steps. Specifically, top leaders ask each direct report to prepare and submit a day or so ahead of meeting one-on-one:

  • An update on progress since last time including a read-out of measures previously agreed upon to track progress.
  • A list of the top three or so things s/he is working on, and for each:
    • What s/he seeks to accomplish
    • What has been done so far to accomplish it
    • What has happened as a result of what has been done so far
    • What has been learned from above
    • What s/he plans to do  next.
  • What s/he needs from their leaders and/or from others in the organization to be successful.

    Continue reading

How to get core leaders clear about whose problem their organization solves.

Get ClearAny organization that performs and grows, exists to solve a problem for a customer.  Its mission explains why it exists and its vision explains where it is headed but neither, individually or together, necessarily explains the solution (WHAT) it provides customers (WHO) and the problem their solution solves (WHY) for those customers.

While it may at first seem simple or obvious, it is usually surprisingly difficult for leaders to sort out and agree on how to describe all three dimensions. Employee surveys invariably reveal that the most urgent need across the organization is to get a better handle on: Who are we and what do we do? which reveals the importance of clearly and consistently communicating all three dimensions to everyone in the organization. Continue reading

National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) Washington, DC Capital Area Chapter to Host Manage to Lead presentation.

NACDOn November 13, 2013 IntelliVen CEO, Peter DiGiammarino, will present Manage to Lead: Seven Truths to Help You Change the World at the monthly meeting of the National Association of Corporate Directors  Click the figure at left to register.

Venue:

Hogan Lovells LLP
555 15th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20004

6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

 

How to think about and work with outsiders to systematically get help in a way that increases the odds of success.

Get HelpLearning to Get Help is one of the top two factors that account for success in maturing a start-up into a credible organization on track to long term growth and performance according to a plan.

Early stage CEO’s at first often think it is a sign of weakness to need help and when they finally do experiment with getting help they often find it frustrating ultimately because they misuse those they enlist.

It helps to think in terms of five types of outside support:

  • Celebrities to draw attention
  • Advisers to provide best practices and perspective based on experience
  • Peers to provide mutual support and community
  • Coaches to provide advice and counsel  to increase personal effectiveness
  • Governors to provide a consistent point of accountability and help with strategy, focus, and access to resources

Continue reading